Pinterested?

Friday, June 10, 2011

Left Wing, Right Wing, Chicken Wing

I’m thrilled to say that this blog is now being read in North America, the U.K., Australia, Malaysia, Germany, France, Turkey, Denmark, India, the United Arab Emirates, New Zealand, and Singapore. Hello, world! It’s nice to make your acquaintance! 
It occurs to me that an international audience may not know much about the NHL (National Hockey League). Allow me to explain, as I rush these bonus appetizer recipes into print in time for the hockey parties being held all around Canada and the US for this evening’s Stanley Cup game. I’ve made these recipes for other occasions, and can vouch for their excellence! 

This is how hockey works: You’ve got this honking huge silver cup named Stanley, see? It’s bigger than a Volkswagen and smaller than Canadian hockey commentator Don Cherry’s ego. You’ve got two teams that skate around, bashing one another with racquets as they try to slam a hard rubber disk over the goal posts and into the big silver cup. The hard rubber disk rhymes with “luck” (If you're a goalie, it rhymes with “duck.” If you're a player, it rhymes with “pluck.” If you're a fan who watches your team’s player miss the net, it rhymes with something else). 
Depending how their team is doing at any given moment, hockey fans scream at the referees, cheer, hug one another, or stomp out in disgust. Regardless of how well or poorly each team fares, Charlie Sheen insists he’s winning. At this particular moment, two baseball teams - the Boston Bruins and the Vancouver Canucks - are fighting over Stanley. The series of games is called the “Stanley Cup Finals.” The winner gets the Heisman Trophy. To disgraced Heisman hockey player O.J. Simpsons chagrin, the game has a “get out of jail” card for slashing, but none for swiping sports memorabilia. He'll probably watch tonight’s game on his TV set in the slammer.
A hockey game lasts for three quarters or six hours, whichever’s longer. At half-time, Canadian fans drink beer, scarf down poutine, and build ice sculptures in their back yards. American fans drink Zambonis, eat hotdogs, and play word-association games involving Anthony Weiner. Each hockey team has four wing men, a breast man, and a goalie. Boston’s goalie is Thomas the Tank. Vancouver’s goalie is MIA. Goalies get all the attention, so today’s bonus recipes are dedicated to hockey’s wing men. 


Sticky Ginger Wings:
1 c. packed brown sugar
2 tbsp. sweet chili sauce
½ c. soy sauce
1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. ground ginger
1 tsp. garlic powder
¼ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. coarse black pepper
2 lb. chicken wings, tips removed and cut as “drumettes” at joints
Sesame seeds (optional)
Preheat oven to 375 deg. F. Combine all ingredients except chicken, mixing well. Pour over chicken in a shallow baking pan. Bake 10 min. and stir. Bake a further 10 min. and stir. Continue baking and stirring every 10 min. until sauce becomes dark and sticky (about 45 min.). Remove from oven, stirring several times over next 10 min. Sauce will get stickier as it cools, completely coating wings. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds over top. Makes 8 appetizer servings. 


Add wings to ginger-soy mix 
Hot and sticky and delicious!

















Devilishly Good Wings (Diablo Sauce):


2 lb. chicken wings, tips removed and cut as “drumettes” at joints 
½ c. brown sugar
¼ c. melted butter
¼ c. chili sauce
½ c. ketchup (“catsup” for my American friends)
2 tbsp. cider vinegar
¼ tsp. chili powder
3 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
3 tbsp. prepared mustard (ballpark mustard, Dijon, or any other favorite variety)
Preheat oven to 400 deg. F. Pour boiling water into a shallow baking pan, spreading chicken wings on rack just above water level. Cover with foil and steam 30 min. While chicken is steaming, combine remaining ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring well. Remove wings from oven, draining water and fat from baking pan. Add wings to sauce mixture, covering all. Return wings to rack and bake, uncovered, 20 min., turning over halfway through baking time and brushing again with sauce. Makes 8 appetizer servings. 
Spicy Soy Wings: 

This recipe requires extra time for marination

¼ c. soy sauce
¼ c. vegetable oil
¼ tsp. Worcestershire sauce
⅓ c. brown sugar
½ tsp. ground ginger
½ tsp. cayenne pepper
¼ tsp. chili powder
¼ tsp. paprika
2 garlic cloves, crushed
2 lb. chicken wings, tips removed and cut as “drumettes” at joints

Preheat oven to 400 deg. F. Combine all ingredients except chicken, mixing well. Pour over chicken. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hr., turning once during this time. Spread chicken wings on rack in shallow baking pan. Brush with remaining soy sauce mixture. Bake 20 min.; turn wings over and brush with reserved ⅓ c. marinade. Bake an additional 15-to-20 min. Makes 8 appetizer servings. 
Honey-Garlic Chicken Wings: 

This recipe requires extra time for marination

¼ c. soy sauce
¼ c. hoisin sauce
¼ c. liquid honey
2 tbsp. dry sherry or chicken stock
2 tbsp. plum sauce
1 tbsp. cider vinegar
1 large garlic clove, minced
2 lb. chicken wings, tips removed and cut as “drumettes” at joints
In large bowl, combine all ingredients except chicken. Remove ⅓ c. marinade; cover and refrigerate. Add chicken drumettes to remaining marinade; cover and refrigerate at least four hours or overnight, stirring occasionally. Arrange wings in a single layer on rack in foil-lined baking sheet. Bake at 400 deg. F. for 20 min.; turn wings over and brush with reserved ⅓ c. marinade. Bake an additional 15-to-20 min. Makes 8 appetizer servings.
The recipe above comes from Canadian Living: Best Appetizers Made Easy by Elizabeth Baird (Madison Press paperback).

PS: See my post of June 26, 2012 indexed as Appetizers: Chicken-Based (Rons Honeyed Chicken Wings). There, you’ll also find The Great Chicken Wing Cook-Off!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Want to find a long-lost favorite recipe? Want to submit one of yours, or simply leave a comment? Always happy to hear from you!